Well that's a pleasant surprise.

Jul. 27th, 2017 04:23 pm
dreamshark: (Default)
[personal profile] dreamshark
 El Presidente's latest attempt to distract the public from the things they should actually be worrying about appears to have backfired. Even a Republican congress that is still eager to rescue their constituency from the burden of affordable health insurance seems startled and appalled by Trump's sudden announcement that transgender people are no longer welcome in the military. Sufficiently appalled for a significant number of them to ACTUALLY SPEAK UP.  And not just the wishy-washy "moderates" - we're talking senators from Alabama, Utah, North Carolina, and more. How things have changed in the past couple of years!

Meanwhile, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff responded with a memo that basically said, politely, that they do not consider the president's social media pronouncements to be policy directives. And more importantly (quote from Defense Department's official statement, but the Joint Chiefs made a similar statement):

">"The Department will continue to focus on our mission of defending our nation and ongoing operations against our foes, while ensuring all service members are treated with respect,"

I certainly could be wrong, but I think the next few days will bring a confused flurry of backing off and denial from the White House. And we can all go back to enjoying the spectacle of the new White House Communications Director attempting to eviscerate the Chief of Staff. I keep intending to watch Game of Thrones some day, but I'm beginning to think that with this White House GoT is redundant. 



head like a hole

Jul. 27th, 2017 05:39 pm
the_siobhan: (Sweetums)
[personal profile] the_siobhan
Welp, it's been an eventful couple of days at the Gin Palace.

Axel was in a somewhat serious bicycle accident in the wee hours of Monday morning. And when I say serious I mean that he knocked himself cold and had to be picked up off the ground by an ambulence. I spent Monday morning at the hospital with him in emergency until they got him a bed, and then the afternoon running around sorting out things like a toothbrush and a change of clothes that weren't completely covered in blood. (I've said this before in my stories about the ways in which I and my fellow humans manage to maim themselves, but man it's a good thing I know ahead of time how much head injuries bleed. Even still, when I first walked into emerg and saw him - Holy Shit.)

He was groggy and out of it Monday morning; thirsty, exhausted, and in pain but mostly coherent by Monday night and bored and cheerful by Tuesday. A couple of CT scans later he is now home and largely back to normal. He has what the release papers described as a "non-mobile fracture" in his skull, which I'm guessing means that the bone is broken, but all the important squishy bits are still safely contained. He's still kinda dizzy and a little more scattered than usual but every time I talk to him he's a little improved.

Deep breath.

So now that the meat suit is safe and in one piece, he has one remaining concern. What the hell happened to his bike?

I went to the spot where the ambulence picked him up. I called the ambulence dispatch. I called the police. Nobody seems to be able to answer the question of what happens to somebody's stuff when the ambulence carts them away from an accident. I mean a wallet, they'd toss into the ambulence. A car would what, get impounded just to get it out of the way? I assume? But nobody seems to know what happens when it's a bicycle.

Just to be clear I don't have an issue AT ALL with the EMT's not dealing with it, their priority is "get dude who landed on his head to a hospital ASAP", which is exactly what it should be. But I do find the fact that nobody knows what happens afterwards to be kind of bizarre.

Whatever. We have insurance for a reason.
rfmcdonald: (me)
[personal profile] rfmcdonald
Me and my ticket #toronto #blondie #garbage #concert #sonycentreto


Last night, I attended the Toronto date of the Rage and Rapture tour, featuring Garbage and Blondie. It was amazing.

My photo album featuring some of my photos taken in the course of the concert is here.

"Superman", Rachel Platten

Jul. 27th, 2017 04:19 pm
alexseanchai: Blue and purple lightning (Default)
[personal profile] alexseanchai
So put your armor on the ground tonight
'Cause everyone's got to come down sometime

You don't have to be Superman
You don't have to be Superman
You don't have to hold the world in your hands
You've already shown me that you can
Don't have to be Superman

2017, #76, "Sovereign", April Daniels

Jul. 27th, 2017 08:46 pm
vatine: books-related stuff (books)
[personal profile] vatine
Previously unread.

Second in Daniels' Nemesis series. Was looking forward to it after having read the first. Now looking even much more forward to #3 in the series, even if I occasionally would like to shout "oh no, you're being an idiot" at the words on the page. But, they describe plausible happenings and misconstruing of behaviour that, well, maybe is more apparent to an external observer.

We're basically continuing "super-powered capers" that the first book was quite full of. With a side-line of court cases, politics and the like.

Ought to work well as a jump-off point, but why not start one book earlier?
vatine: books-related stuff (books)
[personal profile] vatine
Reread.

Been a while since I read this. It's still eminently readable. The narrative style is a little bit weird, in that it flips between first-person and third-person, depending on who our POV character is. Thankfully, only one POV character gets first-person and I don't recall any case of third person when the first person POV character is present. o it mostly works out.

We follow a gambler and thief, who hooks up with some slightly dodgy characters claiming to work for the archmage of the wizard island (town?), re-homing ancient artefacts. Our thief comes in for artefacts whose current owners are unwilling to let said re-homing proceed. And of COURSE it's never than easy.

Being the first of McKenna's Tales of Einarinn series, it's a perfect place to start.

Cherry Pie Recipe

Jul. 27th, 2017 12:45 pm
thewayne: (Default)
[personal profile] thewayne
After discussing and comparing runny cherry pies with my non-runny cherry pie production with [personal profile] stardreamer and [personal profile] murakozi and promising to post the recipe, here's the recipe.

I'm considering using chocolate balsamic vinegar the next time I make one to see what it does to the flavor profile. In discussion on my original post from two weeks ago (hard to believe it's been only two weeks!), I did some research and looked up a lot of cherry pie recipes online. The one thing that ALL of them had in common was that if they included corn starch, and not all of them did, they added it directly to the wet mix! The can of corn starch that I have, Clabber Girl brand, says specifically on the label to mix it with liquid before adding it to whatever it is that you want to thicken. I've added a note to my shopping list on my phone to look at other corn starch brands and see if they also say to mix it with a liquid before adding it to whatever is to be thickened.

So my thought is that if you just add it to whatever is to be thickened that it is overwhelmed by the volume of liquid and can't swell. If you pre-mix it with liquid, in this case an equal amount of lemon juice (and I'm so glad I bought a squeezer thingy!), then you're already starting with a very thick liquid to add to the cherry filling and it thickened beautifully.

I used a pre-made frozen pie crust, and it was wonderful. Currently I don't have cabinet surface area to roll out a pie dough or the guts to try to make one. One of these days....

Cherry Pie
Recipe courtesy of Ree Drummond
Total Time: 2 hr 30 min
Prep: 25 min

Inactive: 1 hr 5 min
Cook: 1 hr
Yield: 8 servings
Level: Easy

Ingredients
Filling:
6 cups frozen tart cherries

⅔ cup sugar

2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar (chocolate?)

¼ cup cornstarch

¼ cup lemon juice (from about 2 lemons)
Vanilla ice cream, for serving

Sweet Pie Crust:

1 ½ sticks (12 tablespoons) salted butter, cold and cut into pieces
¾ cup vegetable shortening, cold and cut into pieces

3 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for rolling the dough

2 large eggs

5 tablespoons cold water

2 tablespoons sugar, plus more for sprinkling

1 tablespoon white vinegar

1 teaspoon kosher salt

Directions
For the filling: Combine the cherries and sugar in a medium saucepan over medium heat and cook until the juices release and are hot and bubbling, about 5 minutes. Stir in the balsamic vinegar and cook for 1 minute. Stir together the cornstarch and lemon juice in a small bowl until combined and add to the cherry mixture. Continue to cook until glossy and thickened, 2 to 3 minutes. Remove from the heat and let cool completely. Cover and refrigerate until ready to use.

For the sweet pie crust:
In a large bowl using a pastry cutter, gradually work the butter and shortening into the flour until it resembles coarse meal, for 3 or 4 minutes. In a small bowl, beat one of the eggs with a fork and pour it into the flour mixture. Add the cold water, sugar, white vinegar and salt. Stir gently to combine.

Form the dough into 2 evenly sized balls and place each ball into a gallon resealable plastic bag. Using a rolling pin, slightly flatten each ball of dough (to about 1/2 inch thick) to make rolling easier later. Seal the bags and place them in the freezer until you need them. (If you will be using them immediately, it's still a good idea to put them in the freezer for 15 to 20 minutes to chill.)

When you are ready to make the crust, remove the dough from the freezer and let thaw for 15 minutes. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.

On a floured surface, roll out one piece of dough starting at the center and working your way out. (Sprinkle some flour over top of the dough if it's a bit too moist.) If the dough is sticking to the countertop, use a metal spatula and carefully scrape it up and flip it over, then continue rolling until it's about 1/2 inch larger in diameter than your pie pan.

With a spatula, lift the dough into the pie pan. Gently press the dough against the edges of the pan. Go around the pie pan pinching and tucking the dough to make a clean edge. Fill with the cooled cherry mixture.

Roll out the second dough the same size and place it over the pie. Trim off the edges and crimp the top and bottom crusts together to seal them. Cut a few vent holes in the top. Beat the remaining egg in a small bowl for the egg wash. Brush the top with the egg wash and sprinkle with sugar

Put the pie onto a rimmed baking sheet lined with foil and bake until the filling is bubbling and the crust is browned, about 50 minutes. If the crust is getting too brown before the pie is finished, cover with foil and continue baking.
Serve with vanilla ice cream.


Recipe courtesy of Ree Drummond
© 2016 Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.


Read more at: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ree-drummond/cherry-pie.html

I am diva, see me strop

Jul. 27th, 2017 07:45 pm
oursin: Photograph of a spiny sea urchin (Spiny sea urchin)
[personal profile] oursin

No, really, if you return to me a copy-edited article for my attention, and mention that you have made changes to the text (as well as changing the title to one that I think is misleading), please to be sending it to me with your changes tracked and marked up.

For if you are going to insult my ability to write English prose, I think I should be able to see how you have 'improved' my text without having to compare it line by line with the text I sent you.

I may possibly have dumped my bibliography on this editor's head...

al_zorra: (Default)
[personal profile] al_zorra
      . . . .  The film, A Quiet Passion (2016), is a psychological biography of the poet, Emily Dickinson. 

 

There are many Emilys in this film, as she, like Whitman, contained multitudes. The first one we meet is the schoolgirl Emily, steadfastly refusing to declare religious conversion and a born again, saved, experience. This Emily is played by Emma Bell, who, then, in a subsequent sequence of family portraits subtly ages and becomes Cynthia Nixon, who performs the star turns of acting as the adult Emily Dickinson. 


Cynthia Nixon as Emily Dickinson and Jennifer Ehle as her sister Vinnie.

I saw the film months ago but the thoughts it provoked about the poet and the times in which she lived, the people among whom she passed her passionate, and often painful life -- exterior and interior -- remain riverlets winding through my ongoing mental preoccupations.


A Quiet Passion is an exquisite film, with the exception of allowing Mabel Loomis Todd to actually see the poet, which she never did.  But here the meeting is, in a terrible, at the pitch of highest plausible drama, a moment when Austin, Emily’s brother, is discovered by her in – not flagrante, exactly – but in a passionately incriminating intimacy -- in hers and Vinnie's home! This is so many violations simultaneously that the infuriated Emily literally spits out the words (not the first time in this family drama, in which all members can and do give as good as they get, when these terrible moments blaze up between them.  This is not Austin's house, he's betraying Susan, her sister-in-law, whom Emily and the whole family love tenderly, and -- Austin has fallen from the place of  perfection and moral arbiter where Emily and the family had so fondly placed him.


Emily's life is so much about family.  The Dickinsons are tied and bonded as closely in affection and intelligence as a family can be. As we know, not all is smooth all the time. The fallings out are passionate and the barbs thrown are cruel and to the exact bulls eye, just because they do know and love each other so well, and are such equals in passion and self-knowledge.  Yet, except for Austin's Grand Treachery, whenever the members fall out, once the poison has erupted, they are horrified, not with the person toward whom the violence was directed, but at themselves.  They are horrified by themselves, and see where they are unfair, and wrong, and always apologize sincerely, at once, and are ashamed.  The apologies are always accepted.


These days I miss that old puritan tradition of constant examination of soul, the authentic desire to be honest with God, to care at least as carefully for the soul as the bank account, and that death and the after life are always in mind. Abigail Adams was fully possessed by this, but like Emily, it never interfered with her sharpness of intelligence and commentary.


In this film the trajectory of the poet's mind is beautifully evoked over time. Death takes one to God, who is the beloved passionate anonymous Byronic lover eagerly awaited, but whom never quite enters the bedroom, the father, the, the father, the Brontëan brother, like life, death and heaven, merging one into another. The Brontës' novels, Wuthering Heights particularly, and Jane Eyre, with whose narrator, Emily closely identifies, painfully convinced that she, like Jane, is unblessed by the beauty and charms that attract men's love, while passionately desiring it -- and equally, believing that love is death for a woman -- are deliriously invoked with delighted consciousness of committing female transgression at every turn in these women's earlier lives.

 

Vryling, Emily, Vinnie, happily making fun of men who take themselves so seriously while knowing nothing.

Some have evaluated the dialog in the earlier parts of the film as too much admiration for Jane Austen – which writer, importantly, unlike the Brontës and George Eliot --  Dickinson did not like. or admire. Thus, intelligently, throughout the film,  admiration of the Brontës is expressed by many of female characters. Perhaps these critics got it wrong -- they are English after all, and there are areas of the trans-Atlantic mind that seem to remain forever veiled to their sight. All these sharp, quick quips and ripostes among Emily, her sister, Vinnie, and their friend, Vryling Buffam, are accompanied by continual happy prolonged laughter. They are happy young women, thoroughly in love with each other’s intelligence, personalities, characters and language brilliance. Their pleasure in each other is so gracefully expressed by the actors (the cast is splendid even beyond the tour de force that Cynthia Nixon achieves), that the viewer participates equally in their pleasure.

 

After Buffam's marriage vows; Emily does not join the other guests outside the church congratulating the newly married couple.

This joy begins to fade with death of friends and relatives, and particularly the marriage of her beloved friend Vryling Buffam's religious conversion, and her subsequent marriage a pastor. Thereafter the friendship, as Emily feared, disappears entirely. It may be Emily deliberately disappeared the friendship, as she was as passionately convinced that marriage had to destroy the only kind of friendship that she could sustain, that of passionate intimacy. Now too disappears the laughter, as her partner in transgressive wit enters the grave of wife and motherhood.  Her terrible loneliness begins to manifest, chosen as deliberately out of anger with the world she's been given, her place in it as a woman, as an artist with a soul as large as the universe, physical maladies and pain, and -- a mind that cannot be contained within a single world, much less house and garden, and which possesses an intimate, passionate relationship with God.


I do wish the film had included the witnessed incident of Emily drowning unwanted newborn kittens in a bucket of water. I had to make due with another acclaimed incident of her father, while waiting to be served his dinner, calmly complaining his plate is not quite clean, and she calmly picking up the plate to smash it into pieces against the table. She explains,  “Now it does not matter.”


Most of all though, I wish the film makers had resisted and not manufactured an event between Emily and Mabel Dodd Loomis, her brother's adulterous lover, and the woman who took over Emily after her death and created out of whole cloth all the phony mythology of the eternal Maid of Amherst, and herself as the only intimate of the poet.  Loomis never saw Emily in the flesh, never exchanged a word with her, and never got a glimpse of her poems.  She stole them from Emily's sister, Vinnie, then went on tour 'acting' Emily, and reading her poems, which bowdlerized to fit better with her phony Emily.  Which is a 19th century tale in itself!


Nevertheless, in terms of Emily herself, and her family, these decades of the 19th century from the 1830's to post the War of the Rebellion, the picture of the finest and most progressive and liberal minds of New England, and thus of our nation, and just how much passion and imagination fueled such minds -- there's never been a film like this.  It is joy to watch from the first scene, to the last.


Though all the actors are superb, in the end, such a film succeeds or fails according the actor who is Dickinson.  Cynthia Nixon is magnificent.  No one can doubt that the poet would be in heaven to see herself as Nixon has portrayed her.  Poetry is anything but a quiet passion.

 

 

jack: (Default)
[personal profile] jack
OK, so. We want to allocate a large block of memory that is contiguous as physical memory. That means allocating physical memory in the kernel (as with kmalloc), and then later providing it to userspace software. Presumably then mapping it into virtual memory for use in userspace with mmap from physical memory in dev/mem, although we may be doing something different for reasons which aren't relevant here.

We happen to have a kernel driver already for other experiments with our specific hardware, so we have somewhere convenient to put this kernel code as needed.

This is running on a hardware board dedicated to a single task, so we have a few advantages. We would prefer to allocate a large chunk on start-up, and will have complete control over which programs we expect to use it, we don't need to dynamically manage unknown different drivers trying to get this memory, and we never intend to free it, and the board will only be used for this so we don't need to make sure other programs run ok. And there's no restriction on addresses, DMA and other relevant peripherals can access the entire memory map, so unlike x86 we don't need to specifically reserve *low* memory.

There are several different related approaches, and I went through a few rabbit holes figuring out what worked.

Option 1: __memblock_alloc_base()

From research and helpful friends, I found some relevant instructions online. One was from "Linux Device Drivers, 3rd edition", the section entitled "Obtaining Large Buffers", about using alloc_bootmem_low to grab kernel pages during boot. I'm not sure, but I think, this was correct, but the kernel started using memblock instead of bootmem as a start-up allocator?

From the code in the contiguous memory allocator (search the kernel source for "cma"), I learned that possibly I should be using memblock functions as well. I didn't understand the different options, but I used the same one as in the contiguous memory allocator code, __memblock_alloc_base and it seemed to work. I tried large powers of 2 and could allocate half of physical memory in one go. I haven't fully tested this, but it seemed to work.

There are several related functions, and I don't know for sure what is correct, except that what the cma code did worked.

This code is currently in a kernel driver init function. The driver must be compiled statically into the kernel, you can't load it as a module later. You could put the code in architecture specific boot-up code instead.

Option 2: cma=

fanf found a link to some kernel patches which tried to make a systematic way of doing this, based on some early inconsistently-maintained patch, which later turned into code which was taken up by the kernel. Google for "contiguous memory allocator". There's an article about it from the time and some comments on the kernel commit.

It's a driver which can be configured to grab a large swath of contiguous memory at startup, and then hand that out to any other driver which needs it.

You specify the memory with "cma=64MB" or whatever size on the kernel command line. (Or possibly in the .config file via "make menuconf"?) You need to do this because it allocates on start-up, and it doesn't know if it should have this or not.

It then returns this memory to normal calls to "alloc_dma_coherent" which is designed to allocate memory which is physically contiguous, but doesn't normally allocate such big blocks. I hadn't tested this approach because I didn't need any specific part of memory so I'd been looking at kmalloc not "alloc_dma_coherent", but a colleague working on a related problem said it worked on their kernel.

It may also do clever things involving exposing the memory to normal allocating, but paging whatever else is there out to disk to free it up when needed, I'm not sure (?)

I was looking at the source code for this and borrowed the technique to allocate memory just for our driver. We may either go with that (since we don't need any further dynamic allocation, one chunk of memory is fine), or revert to using the cma later since it's already in the kernel.

I went down a blind alley because it looked like it wasn't enabled on my architecture. But I think that was because I screwed up "make menuconfig" not specifying the architecture, and actually it is. Look for instructions on cross-compiling it if you don't already have that incorporated in your build process.

Option 3: CONFIG_FORCE_MAX_ZONEORDER

This kernel parameter in .config apparently increases the amount of memory you can allocate with kmalloc (or dma_alloc_coherent?). We haven't explored this further because the other option seemed to work, and I had some difficulties with building .config, so I don't know quite how it works.

I found the name hard to remember at first. For the record, it means, ensure the largest size of zone which can be allocated is at least this order of magnitude (as a power of two). I believe it is actually 1 higher than the largest allowed value, double check the documentation if you're not sure.

Further options

There are several further approaches that are not really appropriate here, but may be useful under related circumstances.

* On many architectures, dma does scatter-gather specifically to read or write from non-contiguous memory so you shouldn't need this in the first place.

* Ensure the hardware can write to several non-contiguous addresses.

* Allocate the several blocks of the largest size kmalloc can allocate, and check that they do in fact turn out to be contiguous since kernel boot-up probably hasn't fragmented the majority of memory.

* Ditto, but just allocate one or several large blocks of virtual memory with malloc, and check that most of it turns out to be allocated from contiguous physical memory because that's what was available. This is a weird approach, but if you have to do it in userspace entirely, it's the only option you could take.

Han

Jul. 27th, 2017 05:30 pm
[syndicated profile] languagelog_feed

Posted by Mark Liberman

Pearls before Swine for 7/23/2017:

A couple of Generation Z language consultants confirm the accuracy of the translations. Or as one of them put it, "Haha right".

Pickleback

Jul. 27th, 2017 11:11 am
steffan: cat loves sun (Default)
[personal profile] steffan
For the benefit of prosperity, today is the day that the White House press secretary read the letter of 9 year old Dylan (aka "Pickle") in support of the president (presumably because they couldn't find any adult republicans willing to write about their Trump themed birthday party.)

This pickle stuff is comedy GOLD, Jerry! The letter in question (at least until twitter breaks the image link...) follows:




Some are saying on twitter that "Pickle" is fake and are tweeting out under the hashtag #pickletruther But fake or not, this is a huge calculated PR move and it makes you wonder what they were thinking. The new press team under Scaramucci is shaping up to be very strange.

As a political play, it seems to be calculated to stir up the "elite vs normal joe" hornet's nest that the Trump team has played so well throughout the election. The left is incredulous of such a bare sentimental move, and looks at the Trump playbook (like impersonating a staffer, 'John Baron' so that he can say great things about himself in the third person.) While the red hat crowd see elites trashing a cute child for his "deplorable" support of the grand Cheeto. "HOW DARE THOSE AVOCADO TOAST EATING LEFTIES QUESTION THE SIMPLE FAITH OF A CHILD?"

In the end, fake or real, Pickle is a pawn, a distraction from the ever increasing intensity of the Russia probe. I'm just glad "Pickle" hasn't come in the form of a preemptive strike on North Korea.

[TV] IN WHICH I HAVE FEELINGS.

Jul. 27th, 2017 06:16 pm
kaberett: Clyde the tortoise from Elementary, crawling across a map, with a red tape cross on his back. (elementary-emergency-clyde)
[personal profile] kaberett
Feelings the first: I've just had A finish Season 1 of Korra, and I'm going to be making him watch Spirited Away before Season 2, because that sequence is frankly one of the few things I like about Season 2, so. BUT. Having very recently watched the end of Book 3 of A:tLA with him, I Noticed a Thing about the end of Season 1 that I had not, previously, and then FEELINGS. Spoilers, obviously. )



Orphan Black is also a bunch of FEELINGS, also has spoilers (up to 5.07), and also comes with a content note for Significant Gore slightly beyond what one normally expects of the show, along with all the usual "everything is horrifying but I love all of them" caveats.

Read more... )

Hey, cis allies!

Jul. 27th, 2017 12:38 pm
tim: Tim with short hair, smiling, wearing a black jacket over a white T-shirt (Default)
[personal profile] tim
In light of the trans military ban, a lot of you have written things on social media along the lines of, "Trans people, I love and support you, you're not a burden, etc." That's nice, but it would be nicer if you told your fellow cis people that disrespecting trans people isn't behavior that you accept. Another thing you can do to show that your words aren't just words is to give a trans person money for necessary medical care that many trans people can't access (and accessing it will almost certainly become harder in the next year.)

Here's one opportunity to do just that. Rory is an acquaintance of mine and I can vouch for them being a legit person with a need.

Sharing photos

Jul. 27th, 2017 04:36 pm
ghoti_mhic_uait: (Default)
[personal profile] ghoti_mhic_uait
One of the things I've been doing recently is learning photography. I'm getting the hang of a proper camera, and taking a lot of photos and hopefully improving. I've taken a couple of photos I'm really pleased with, and want to share further. Where's a good place for that?

This is what I've thought of: Facebook, but then Colin can't see. Tumblr, but I basically only use tumblr from my phone and that's a bit tricky. Just putting them on public galleries on Google, but I find the permissions hard to get right. Instagram, which seems to be a place for editing photos rather than showing off raw photos?

Any other ideas I didn't think of yet? Or is there a reason I'm just wrong about one of those?

NIF: eps 17-19 the hiltless knives

Jul. 27th, 2017 08:55 am
sartorias: Mei Changs (MC)
[personal profile] sartorias
There is plenty of action in these three episodes, but what really strikes me is the emotional complexity. More is revealed about the past, which reverberates deeply in the present day--these are the hiltless knives, memory, regret, emotion made exponentially intense by being hidden. There are confrontations that demonstrate these hiltless knives, beautifully broken up by hilarious episodes: there is no lugubrious all grim all the time.

Altogether the emotional rollercoaster is exhilarating, and it shore doesn’t hurt that everyone, and everything, is so very beautiful.

Read more... )
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